Generic Rogaine and Minoxidil Review

Is generic Rogaine the same as "Rogaine for Men" & "Rogaine for Women"?

And do either the brand name or generic versions really work?

This page answers those questions.

Does Rogaine Really Work?

The active ingredient in Rogaine is the drug minoxidil - this is a vasodilator which means it widens (dilates) blood vessels.

This explains why, during the 1960s, it was being used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension).

But, in the 1970s it was discovered that this antihypertensive drug also produced some hair regrowth as a side effect.

So, new trials were then carried out using minoxidil on hair loss patients instead...

Trials

In the 1980s, a number of trials reported that minoxidil was capable of producing "significant hair growth".

FDA approval

The success it appeared to show led to FDA approval for its use in the treatment of hair loss (androgenetic alopecia) and it entered the market in the late 1980s.

How does it work?

There is some debate about this. But, given that it can dilate blood vessels, this is obviously something that could encourage blood to flow more easily to the hair roots.

And it might also provide hair cells with nitric oxide (another substance that can dilate blood vessels and so, help hair grow).

So this is most probably the mechanism behind any success minoxidil brings to hair loss patients.

But it’s not a cure!

Many of the clinical trials which showed its effectiveness have been in younger men and women with only mild hair loss, and for a relatively short period of time.

So, in other words, the older you are, the longer you've suffered hair loss and the more severe it is, the less likely it is that minoxidil will help you.

And, regardless of your age or anything else, this drug is only meant to be used on the crown of your head and not at the front temple region. So, if you’ve got a receding hairline, it’s unlikely to grow any new hair for you in this region.

Here are a few details for men and women specifically:

Men

Despite numerous trials showing "significant hair growth", the original regular strength product (2% minoxidil) was still ineffective for many men. So a stronger (5%) product and later on, a more user-friendly foam version of it, were introduced to improve effectiveness (obviously the stronger the drug, the more chance it has of producing some hair regrowth).

Women

Although the official Rogaine website has now been changed since I first researched this, it used to have a "Product Details" tab which stated that, in placebo-controlled trials on relatively young women (18 to 45) with mild to moderate hair loss, 19% experienced moderate hair regrowth after 8 months.

However, moderate regrowth was also reported by 7% of those on the placebo liquid (i.e., even though it had no therapeutic effect).

Well, to me, this suggests it's quite likely that 7% of the women using minoxidil might also have experienced such regrowth (i.e., regardless of using the drug). In which case, perhaps only 12% of women gained moderate hair growth as a direct result of using minoxidil (i.e., 19% minus 7%).

And 12% is not a lot!

The brand name Rogaine does now have a higher strength (5%) foam product for women (but the liquid version for women is still 2%).

Regardless of the product strength or the form it takes, many men and women still don't benefit from using minoxidil – and that’s regardless of whether it’s generic Rogaine or the brand name version.

And it also has side effects

Examples of which include:

Mild - A dry, flaky, itchy scalp.
Moderate - A red rash might develop on your skin.
Severe - Breathing problems.

And this is just the tip of the iceberg! For the full list, read the rogaine side effects page.

If you read my ebook "How Not to Stop Hair Loss" you'll learn many more Rogaine facts and quite a few shocks about this and several other mainstream hair loss products and treatments, and why I think you should steer clear of them all.

Is Generic Rogaine Exactly the Same As the Brand Name Rogaine?

Generic Rogaine

Whenever a pharmaceutical company patents a new drug, they’ll get exclusive rights to market it (which is for 20 years if the patent is filed in the USA).

After this time, the patent expires, and the market is opened up to competition (and the price should come tumbling down).

So, generic minoxidil (or generic Rogaine as it's often called) is now produced by many other companies too. And this increase in competition has meant that you can get the generic Rogaine a lot cheaper than the brand name version.

But is it exactly the same?

Well, minoxidil is a drug with a specific chemical formula. So that formula shouldn’t be any different regardless of whether another brand name, or just the generic name "minoxidil", is being used for marketing.

However, whilst I personally don't believe in using any unnatural method to treat hair loss, if you must use drugs, surely it’s best to stay on the "safer" side and use the branded version rather than generic Rogaine.

That's because you'll know for sure that you're putting the pure drug onto your scalp (and at the concentration stated) from the company that has FDA approval.

Anything else and you could run the risk of putting other substances into your body too – if the generic Rogaine you get hold of has impurities, it might not get absorbed as well as the branded drug and so give a lesser effect.

Can you get generic Rogaine as foam and liquid products?

The branded version of Rogaine is available in both these forms. For men, 5% strength versions are available as both foam and liquid. For women, there is now a 5% foam version available, along with the original 2% strength liquid.

Generic versions of the liquid (both 2% and 5% strengths) have been around for a while. And a generic version of the foam for men is available too. Finally, since the brand name version now has a 5% foam product for women, no doubt generic versions of that will also become available in time. 

You do not need a prescription to get hold of either the branded or non-branded versions of all these hair loss products.

The branded product range used to include Progaine Shampoo (Pregaine in the UK) which did not contain minoxidil, but was discontinued following low levels of sales.

This is page 3 of 3.

Read previous page? Are Men or Women More Likely to Suffer Rogaine Side Effects?

Return to Hair Loss Product Reviews Index.

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